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Everybody has an Opinion on CNN

I get the most feedback by far on CNN, and, in comparison to feedback on other sources on the chart, CNN is unusual because I get feedback that it should be moved in all the different directions (up, down, left, and right). Further, most people who give me feedback on other sources suggest that I should just nudge a source one way or another a bit. In contrast, many people feel very strongly that CNN should be moved significantly in the direction they think.

I believe there are a couple of main reasons I am getting this kind of feedback.

  • CNN is the source most people are most familiar with. It was the first , and is the longest-running, 24 hour cable news channel. It’s on at hotels, airports, gyms, and your parent’s house. Even if people are news critics of nothing else, if they are critics of anything, they will be critics of CNN, because they are most familiar with it.
  • CNN is widely talked about by other media outlets, and conservative media outlets in particular, who often describe it as crazy-far left. Usually those who tell me it needs to go far left are the ones reading conservative media—no surprise there.
  • People tend to base their opinions of CNN on what leaves the biggest impression on them, and there are a lot of aspects that can leave an impression:
    1. For some people, the fact that they can just have it on in the background during the day, during which they see a large sampling of CNN’s news coverage, they see that programming is mostly accurate and informs them of a lot of US news they would be interested in. These individuals tend to think that CNN should be ranked higher, perhaps all the way up in “fact-reporting” and mainstream
    2. For others, they know they can tune into CNN for breathless, non-stop coverage of an impending disaster, like a Hurricane, or a breaking tragedy, such as a mass shooting. People can have a few different kinds of impressions from this. First, that they can count on that fact that they will get all the facts that are known repeated to them within 10 minutes of tuning in. That’s another reason to put them up in “fact-reporting.” Second, more savvy observers know that CNN makes not-infrequent mistakes and often jumps the gun in these situations. They usually qualify their statements properly, but they will still blurt out facts about a suspect, number of shooters, fatalities, that are not quite yet verified. That causes some people to rank them lower quality on the fact-reporting scale. Third, people know that once CNN runs out of current stuff to talk about, they will bring on analysts about all related (or unrelated) subjects (e.g., lawyers, criminologists, climate change scientists, etc.) often for several days following the story. This tends to leave people with the impression that CNN provides a lot of analysis and opinion (including lots of it that is valid and important) in addition to fact reporting. So a ranking somewhere along the analysis/opinion spectrum (a little above where I have it) seems appropriate.
    3. For yet others, the kind of coverage that leaves the biggest impression is the kind that includes interviews and panels of political commentators. The contributors and guests CNN has on for political commentary range widely in quality, from “voter who knows absolutely nothing about what he is talking about” to “extremely partisan, unreliable political surrogate” to “experienced expert who provides good insight.” People who pay attention to this kind of coverage note that CNN does a few crazy things.
      1. First, they have a chyron that says “Breaking News:…” followed by something that is clearly not breaking news. For example: “Breaking: Debate starts in one hour.” Eye roll. This debate has been planned for months and is not breaking. Further, they have a chyron (big banner on the bottom of the screen) for almost everything, which seems unnecessary and sensationalist, but has been adopted by MSNBC, FOX, and others. Often, the chyron’s content is sensationalist.
      2. Second, in the supposed interest of being “balanced” and “showing both sides, they often have extreme representatives from each side of the political spectrum debating each other. This practice airs and lends credibility to some extreme, highly disputed positions. Balance, I think, would be better represented by having guests with more moderate positions. Interviews with KellyAnne Conway, who often says things that are untrue, things that are misleading, and makes highly disputed opinion statements, are something else. Even though the hosts challenge her, it often appears that the whole point of having her as a guest is for the purposes of showcasing how incredulous the anchors are at her statements. This seems to fall outside of the purpose of news reporting. What’s worse, though (to me, anyway), is that they will hire partisan representatives as actual contributors and commentators, which gives them even more credibility as sources one should listen to about the news, even though they have a clear partisan, non-news agenda. They hired Jeffery Lord, who routinely made the most outlandish statements in support of Trump, and Trump’s ACTUAL former campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski. That was mind-boggling in terms of lack of journalism precedence (and ethics) and seemed to be done for sensationalism (and ratings, rather than for the purposes of news reporting, which is to deliver facts). Those hires were a big investment in providing opinion. I think it was extremely indicative of CNN’s reputation for political sensationalism when the Hill ran two headlines within a few weeks of each other saying something like “CNN confirms it will not be hiring Sean Spicer as a contributor” and CNN confirms it will not be hiring Anthony Scaramucci as a contributor” shortly after each of their firings.
  • Third, their coverage is heavily focused on American political drama. I’ll elaborate on this in a moment.

Personally, the topics discussed in (c) left the biggest impression on me. That is why I have them ranked on the line between “opinion, fair persuasion” and “selective or incomplete story, unfair persuasion.” The impact of the guests and contributors who present unfair and misleading statements and arguments really drives down CNN’s ranking in my view. I have them slightly to the left of center, though, because they tend to have a higher quantity of guests with left-leaning positions.

 

I have just laid out that my ranking is driven in large part by a subjective measure rather than an objective, quantitative one. An objective, quantitative one would take all the shows, stories, segments, guests, and analyze all the statements made, and would, on a percentage basis, say how many of these things were facts, opinions, analysis, fair or unfair, misleading, untrue, etc. I have not done this analysis but would guess that a large majority of the statements made in a 24 hour period on CNN would fall in to reputable categories (fair, factual, impartial). Perhaps even 80% or more would fall in to that category. So one could reasonably argue that CNN deserves to be higher; say, 80% of the way up (or whatever the actual number is), if that is how you wanted to rank it.

However, I argue for the inclusion of a subjective assessment that comes from the question “what impression does this source leave?” Related questions are “what do people rely on this source for,” “what do they watch it for,” and “what is the impact on other media?” I submit that the opinion and analysis panels and interviews, with their often-unreliable guests, leave the biggest impression and make up a large portion of what people rely on and watch CNN for. I also submit that these segments make the biggest impact in the rest of media and society. For example, other news outlets will run news stories, the content of which are “Here’s the latest crazy thing KellyAnne said on CNN.” These stories make a significant number of impressions on social media, therefore amplifying what these guests say.

I also include a subjective measure that pushes it into the “selective or incomplete story” category, which comes from trying to look at what’s not there; what’s missing. In the case of CNN, given their resources as a 24 hour news network, I feel like a lot is missing. They focus on American political drama and the latest domestic disaster at the expense of everything else. With those resources and time, they could inform Americans about the famine in South Sudan, the war in Yemen, and the refugees fleeing Myanmar, along with so many other important stories around the world. They could do a lot more storytelling about how current legislation and policies impacts the lives of people here and around the world. Their focus on White House palace intrigue inaccurately, and subliminally, conveys that those are the most important stories, and that, I admit, just makes me mad.

Many reasonable arguments can be made for the placement of CNN as a whole, but a far more accurate way to rank the news on CNN is to rank an individual show or story. People can arrive at a consensus ranking much more easily when doing that. I will be doing that on future graphs (I know you can’t wait for a whole graph just on CNN, and I can’t either!) for individual news outlets.

 

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2 Comments on "Everybody has an Opinion on CNN"

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Oz du Soleil
Guest

Exciting! Thanks for peeling this down for us. Very thoughtful. Even though I’ve got my own opinion I love seeing how you dissect this stuff.

C Smith
Guest

Thank you for showing us how to become better at critical thinking. In particular, I was struck by your notion of noticing ‘what’s been left out.’ That’s surely something we must all get better at.

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